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Evan Osnos: Biden Brims with Confidence

March 12, 2024
Notes
Transcript
Biden has the air of a man with no doubt about his campaign strategy—which is not exactly soothing to some Democrats and Never Trumpers. Plus, Hur’s questionable framing of his report, the RNC bloodbath, jealous elites, and Tucker can’t get no respect. Osnos joins Tim today.

show notes

By Evan:
Joe Biden’s Last Campaign
Rules for the Ruling Class
Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now
Wildland: The Making of America’s Fury
Plus:
Richard Ben Cramer’s “What It Takes”

This transcript was generated automatically and may contain errors and omissions. Ironically, the transcription service has particular problems with the word “bulwark,” so you may see it mangled as “Bullard,” “Boulart,” or even “bull word.” Enjoy!
  • Speaker 1
    0:00:00

    Alright. So we’ve got a few items in the news relevant to my past employers that I wanna give you my thoughts on. First, our friends at the Republican accountability project of Relon republican voters against Trump today. I was the political director for this group back in twenty twenty. I gotta tell you this was the most fulfilling professional experience of my life for those that don’t remember, we gather testimonial videos from regular Republican voters who wanted to come out and explain why they were opposing Trump, and then we’re gonna turn clips of those videos into ads so we ran in the swing states We dreamed up this concept as a pretty straightforward ad campaign where, you know, I don’t know, handful of people sent us videos and we tested out the best ones and turned them into ads.
  • Speaker 1
    0:00:43

    But it turned into something much more. A community, a movement of like minded people who were looking for political home emerged. We were awash. In these videos from people who need to be reminded that they weren’t the crazy ones. People told me it was like, how they imagined coming out of the closet would be.
  • Speaker 1
    0:01:01

    I know something about that. Or, it kind of sometimes sounded like they’re a confessional at an AA meeting. That something I can’t relate to. Thank god, but the fact that those are the comparison points show how critical this was for people trying to change our political identity and, you know, find a place of of people that were like minded. So I wanted to take this opportunity to say, hey.
  • Speaker 1
    0:01:24

    Say, I appreciate everybody that did it in twenty twenty. We gotta saddle back up in twenty twenty four. So if you’re a former Trump voter, Unfortunately, people like me, we don’t count anymore. That’s why I’m not doing it this time. If you, you know, voted for Hillary and Biden, I don’t I don’t know that your messages quite landing with the voters we need.
  • Speaker 1
    0:01:40

    But if you’re a former Trump voter, or you know somebody who is, go to r vat dot org to submit a video. I look forward to seeing the ads, Sarah, and the team produce And even though I’m not directly involved this time, they’ll be getting my unpaid advice here on the podcast. Okay. What other news item? From another place I used to Bulwark, a bloodbath at the Republican National Committee.
  • Speaker 1
    0:01:59

    Sixty people laid off. This is significant in a few ways. Number one, the money problems for team Trump are very real. President Biden is already on the air with the ad that we discussed on yesterday’s podcast, really strong ad. RNC is meanwhile totally behind the eight ball and reorganizing their whole organization right now.
  • Speaker 1
    0:02:20

    So This is, I think, significant in giving the buying team a leg up as they try to maybe change some of those poll numbers here over the next couple months over the spring. Number two, I think it’s significant because this is pretty dramatic. The RNC is a building that is very stagnant. It’s it’s there’s a lot of lifers in there. It’s where people think they have secure jobs.
  • Speaker 1
    0:02:39

    So just a mass firing like this in the middle of the cycle, I think it’s gonna lead to some hard feelings, maybe some more food fighting and, that’s something we’re gonna be monitoring. Lastly, I do think there’s one green shoot for the Republicans while Lara Trump is now in there, and she’s gonna be funneling money to her hubby’s daddy’s lawyers. There’s another person involved. Chris Lasavita. I worked with him.
  • Speaker 1
    0:03:00

    He’s spearheaded Trump’s campaign, pretty shamefully. He knows the RNC. He can recruit staff people who aren’t weirdo Hobbits, who are not gnomes. And so they do have enough time to write the ship. Biden has a head start here.
  • Speaker 1
    0:03:12

    They have enough time to write the ship. If the Bozos get out of his way, that’s a big if. So that’s something Mark Caputo will be watching for us. Check out his Magaville newsletter. If you had it, and he told readers last month that this was coming.
  • Speaker 1
    0:03:23

    So make sure to go to the Bulwark dot com, sign up for his newsletter. Alright. Up next, Evan Oznes. Alright. Welcome to the Secret Podcast.
  • Speaker 1
    0:03:37

    I am here with the prolific Evan Osno, staff writer at the New Yorker he wrote the biography Joe Biden in the life of the run and what matters now in twenty twenty. He interviewed Biden again this past January and his profile. Joe Biden’s last campaign created a bit of a stir, Evan. Thanks for doing this.
  • Speaker 2
    0:03:56

    My pleasure, Tim. It’s fun to be with you.
  • Speaker 1
    0:03:58

    Alright. I wanna get to the report today, but first, I just have to start with your lead, which was you in the Oval Office and president Biden, wanting to show you where Trump sat and watched the revolution. So just talk to us about that. Exchange and, why you led with it and sort of Biden’s view on on the stakes here.
  • Speaker 2
    0:04:19

    Yeah. You know, that was one of those moments that was not something I was expecting. I kinda come into the Oval Office for an interview, and I’ve prepared to take my seat. And right off the bat, I asked him about that space, basically, about the oval off and I could tell he was slightly bored by my question. And so then he immediately was like, let me, follow me.
  • Speaker 2
    0:04:41

    I’ll show you where Trump sat and watched, as he said, the revolution, and we kinda go back into the little private chambers behind the Oval Office. And was pretty clear that the Secret Service did not expect him to go off pieced because they were sort of startled to find him in the Carter. And he said, you made a joke about it. He’s like, hey, guys, it’s a raid. And then he keeps walking.
  • Speaker 2
    0:05:03

    We end up in this little dining room, and that’s where, of course, Trump sat on the afternoon of January sixth. And there was a kind of interesting moment because I kind of thought, frankly, that when we got there, he was gonna unspool a little speech about democracy or something like that.
  • Speaker 1
    0:05:19

    Yeah.
  • Speaker 2
    0:05:19

    But he didn’t actually what he did all he did was sort of let out a kind of rueful laugh, I think, is how I put it in the piece because he sort of wanted to speak for itself. Like, here you are. You’ve got a portrait of Lincoln on the wall. You’ve got this place that has been essentially the sanctum sanctorum for presidents. And this is where Donald Trump sat with his diet coke and his remote control rewinding to watch violence at the capitol.
  • Speaker 2
    0:05:42

    And there was an element. It was kind of a revealing moment to me because I realized There’s a lot that Joe Biden thinks is self explanatory about Trump, that it’s almost like he finds it hard to believe that people don’t see Trump the way he does. And that is a kind of running theme that I think is important.
  • Speaker 1
    0:05:59

    Yeah. Did you ask if he kept the super DVR?
  • Speaker 2
    0:06:03

    The TV is still there on the wall.
  • Speaker 1
    0:06:05

    And Is it massive? Is it like out of place? How big this TV is for, you know, what what would be appropriate for the space?
  • Speaker 2
    0:06:12

    Yeah. Of course. It’s a it’s a it’s a kind of ludicrous intrudes. I mean, the the room is this, like, you know, dark wood. It’s got this, basically, this treasured portrait of Lincoln with his commanders on the eve of winning the civil war.
  • Speaker 2
    0:06:25

    It’s got these challenge coins by military units, and then there is something that you got it best by, like, you know, as a Bulwark Friday special, taking up an entire wall. Was looking back at historical portraits of that room because I wanted to understand just how different it was. And there
  • Speaker 3
    0:06:41

    used to be, like, this
  • Speaker 2
    0:06:46

    classic portrait on the wall, something from the, you know, national galleries or something. And in and Trump took a look at it and was like, no, we could do better. Let’s put up a put up a flat screen. I
  • Speaker 1
    0:06:57

    like to bring it up a lot too. So I liked that the president likes to bring it up. We are very in line. I think it is a nice encapsulation of how pathetic and Patriotic Trump is. Okay.
  • Speaker 1
    0:07:05

    I wanna get more to your piece, but we have a little bit of news today. So Robert hurst testifying on the hill. The transcript of the Biden exchange has now been released as well. I’m gonna go through that, but I’m I’m just curious first, since you spent you know, a decent amount of time with him in January, and then the her report comes out about a month after that. How did, like, that with your experience.
  • Speaker 1
    0:07:28

    And what was your sort of reaction to that assessment of Biden?
  • Speaker 2
    0:07:32

    So I talked to him a little bit before that report came out, whatever it was a few before. And to be honest, going into that interview, I think, like any reporter, I was pretty attuned to this question of what’s his mental state like? I mean, this is the biggest question facing the Democratic electorate in some ways. I mean, I was really focused on that. I mean, partly because I interviewed him over time, and I you know, I’d interviewed him in twenty twenty and going back to twenty fourteen.
  • Speaker 2
    0:07:58

    So I sort of had some baseline for comparison. And what I concluded quite clearly over the course of this experience. I was with him for about forty minutes interviewing him, and he didn’t bungle a name. He didn’t bungle a date. What he is is more or less what you see is what you get, which is that his voice is with the exception of the state of the union, his voice is pretty thin and has weakened.
  • Speaker 2
    0:08:23

    And, you know, he kinda coughs a lot. He clears his throat a lot. He’s got this acid reflux thing.
  • Speaker 3
    0:08:27

    His
  • Speaker 2
    0:08:27

    gate. The gate. Yeah. I mean, he shuffled. And that is now a visible and sort of completely obvious fact.
  • Speaker 2
    0:08:34

    But what is also obvious if you’re talking to him is that his mental process is the same. His mental status as far as I could tell was unchanged.
  • Speaker 1
    0:08:44

    Over that whole window, that unchanging, because when you say unchanged, you’re not talking about seeing him on TV. I mean, you interviewed him for the book. You’ve been interviewing him for what? A decade and a half now. Right?
  • Speaker 2
    0:08:54

    It started ten years ago, actually. It was ten years ago in twenty fourteen. I interviewed him for the first time. And what I would say is different is that he does less of the filling of the space. There used to be a kind of compulsive, reflexive, you know, let me wrap my arms around you with my words element of Joe Biden that was, like, goes back to just who he is as a human being kind of wanting to win over every face in the room.
  • Speaker 2
    0:09:21

    Well, you know, which is something that he’s been doing since he was, like, in his twenties. He doesn’t do quite as much of that anymore. There’s, like, a little bit of a, I don’t need to do that now element to it, which is part of what he was getting at, you know, when we’re in that dining room. Like, he doesn’t need to fill space. And I got that feeling and some of that is is a little bit testy.
  • Speaker 2
    0:09:38

    He’s a little bit like I think there’s a piece of him that is that feels like I’ve made it here. This is the apex of American political power. I have the right to decide what I wanna say and not say, and I’m not gonna fill a buster just for the sake of of winning you over. That that is a little bit noticeable to me. If I go back and compare it for instance to how I talked to him, you know, ten years ago, and he was a little bit more seeking to impress on every story.
  • Speaker 1
    0:10:01

    So interesting. The vice presidency wasn’t enough. Still seeking to impress as the vice president had to get to
  • Speaker 2
    0:10:07

    Oh, definitely not. The vice presidency was not enough from his perspective. I mean, he always used to diminish it.
  • Speaker 1
    0:10:12

    I think there’s been a TV show about that. Okay. So, In the testimony, one thing that jumped out of me, the herd testimony I’m reading this transcript this morning, first, the Bo Biden story was completely told incorrectly by both her and Biden really. How her describes it on the transcript is incorrect. Biden is trying to place himself in a timeline, and he says, May thirtieth about those death getting it exactly right, then they go back forth on the air.
  • Speaker 1
    0:10:40

    He’s like, what month did Bo die? Oh god. It was May thirtieth. Then was it twenty fifteen when he died? That’s right.
  • Speaker 1
    0:10:46

    So he has the date and year right on that, which which her misrepresents in the report. Then Biden kind of wrist represents the transcript because he says that her asked him about it, but he didn’t. Biden was just using it as a as a point in time. A couple other things from the transcript that jumped out of me, he’s just funny still. And he’s still on the ball for somebody that is losing mental capacity.
  • Speaker 1
    0:11:06

    Her is showing him some pictures and trying to ask when this was, when this was, and there’s one picture we his arm around Lindsey Graham. He’s like, that one must be old because I got my arm around Lindsey Graham. There’s another link. He says there’s a lengthy discourse on the torque of electric vehicles versus his corvette, and he makes some car noises, and he talks at length about cars. I mean, that that seems pretty Joe Biden to me.
  • Speaker 1
    0:11:29

    A decent amount of cursing. So anyway, you’ve had a chance to look at the transcript. Well, what were your what were your takeaways?
  • Speaker 2
    0:11:35

    To the car point, at that point, if you’re looking at the transcript, you know, Joe Biden is kind of rhapsodizing about how fast these new electric vehicles go to which Robert Her replies according to the transcript Whoa.
  • Speaker 3
    0:11:47

    Cool.
  • Speaker 2
    0:11:47

    That’s what he said. So there’s a yeah. Like, cool. So there’s a I mean, that actually was Joe Biden who then says, yeah, it’s pretty cool. Of the things that comes across to me, Tim, and I think you’re getting the sense from the transcript is that they had a a kind of interaction that is a much more three-dimensional normal interaction.
  • Speaker 2
    0:12:03

    Then you would have suspected based on her eventual report, which made it sound like, you know, Joe Biden is struggling to come up with the major events of his own life. And, I mean, this transcript, if I was a democrat who wants Joe Biden to be elected, this transcript, I should go and hand deliver every American on their doorstep because it makes it makes the case a lot more clearly than than anybody can do in summary, partly because it’s a five hour interview over a long time. I think one thing that’s worth pointing out that I certainly didn’t get from Robert Hurry’s report was when they’re having these discussions about dates, it’s because they’re doing this really minute reconstruction of things like how did you hang your folders in your file cabinet in the years twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen? Mister president. And there are points where Biden is quite literally sort of irritated by the pick au nature of it to use a good New Orleans term.
  • Speaker 2
    0:13:02

    I mean, like, he’s like, I don’t have a clue. He says over and over again, like, I don’t have the foggest idea. Some version of that. Meaning, not, like, who are you and where are we? But I really did not pay attention to whether or not my file folders.
  • Speaker 2
    0:13:16

    I mean, at one point, her is asking why we’re some in red folders, some in yellow folders, some in blue folders. And Biden is kind of saying to him, I don’t know. That was somebody else’s job. I don’t know.
  • Speaker 1
    0:13:29

    Also, just to your point about the three-dimensional nature of it. The thing that I I think is the most false about the context of the initial her report versus this transcript to me is that the point her is trying to make when he says that he’s elderly. And that he has trouble remembering things. The ostensible reason why he brings that up is to say that I don’t think a jury could hold this person responsible Right? Because he seems like a forgetful old man.
  • Speaker 1
    0:13:53

    Right? And so to me, that’s pretty damning. Right? That’s her’s assessment is that this person is so forgetful and so elderly that even if he did commit, you know, a crime here, I couldn’t put him on the stand because the jury wouldn’t convict him because he seemed so out of it. That’s an insane framing when you compare it to the transcript.
  • Speaker 1
    0:14:12

    Okay. Like, there are plenty of things to poke holes about in Joe Biden. He’s not perfect. But I I think that is the thing that comes off to me as the most false.
  • Speaker 2
    0:14:21

    Yeah. I mean, it’s it’s amazing to me what her left out of his report that he said at the time. Like, for instance, at one point, he is praising Biden’s what he calls his photographic reconstruction of the geography of the naval observatory. He then is over and over, he’s saying after Biden answers some question about something. He says, oh, that is that’s helpful.
  • Speaker 2
    0:14:42

    Oh, thank you. That’s that’s very helpful. And and at one point, her himself is kind of running a ground on some of this detail, and he apologizes for misremembering is his word. This is Robert Hur, speaking of himself. Robert Her, a vigorous middle aged man with one thinks a adequate memory is having trouble as he says, he’s talking about a couple of questions that he described as he acknowledged were clunkily phrased.
  • Speaker 2
    0:15:08

    So I think there is a way in which that piece that was not in her’s report. Her’s report, of course, focus is entirely on these questions that we’ve been talking about is a pretty impoverished version of what actually happened over the course of those two days.
  • Speaker 4
    0:15:24

    Mister Her, what is in the rules is you don’t gratuitously do things to prejudice this subject of an investigation when you’re declining to prosecute. You don’t gratuitously add language that you’ll know will be useful in a political campaign. You were not born yesterday. You understood exactly what you were doing. It was a choice.
  • Speaker 4
    0:15:46

    You certainly didn’t have to include that language. You could have said vis a vis the documents that were found in the university. The president did not recall. There is nothing more common. You know this.
  • Speaker 4
    0:15:56

    I know this. There’s nothing more common with a witness of any age when asked about events that are years old to say I do not recall. Indeed, they’re instructed by their attorney to do that. If they have any question about it, you understood that. You made a choice.
  • Speaker 4
    0:16:11

    That was a political choice. It was the wrong choice.
  • Speaker 1
    0:16:17

    Back to your article. There were a couple concerning items in the article that I wanna go through with you, but before I do that, It’s a tour de force. It’s very it’s it’s like That means leisha. It’s a capacious article. Plenty of room.
  • Speaker 1
    0:16:30

    So I want you to kinda sum up what your kind of main takeaways were from it before I start to, you know, start to bed wet a little bit.
  • Speaker 2
    0:16:38

    I think my dominant impression, the thing that really I walked out of there and then became only clearer and clearer over time as I talk to his aids and everybody else is that this man has no doubts about what he is doing. Yep. Like, Tim, I think that’s the hardest thing for people to get from home. You sort of assume given all of the atmospheric pressure around him, all of the static involved in this, you know, the her report and his memory, you might think, is Joe Biden, you know, sitting at home looking out at the window and asking Jill, am I doing the right thing. And you come away actually from the time with him, you realize, nope.
  • Speaker 2
    0:17:16

    He’s not doing that. And that is a it’s a very big fact. And some people will hate that fact and some people will like that fact because there are people who say, well, maybe he should be having more more self examination than he is, but it’s important I thought to make that a really clear point. He believes in himself, he believes in what he’s doing. And now his job is to make other people see him the way that he sees him.
  • Speaker 1
    0:17:39

    K. I’m glad I came away from the article with what you wanted me to because my note here, in big bold on my notes is overconfidence. I just I have a little bit here. So here’s one thing that worries me about the story is that Biden, I think, has in his own self assessment has kept proving people wrong. Right?
  • Speaker 1
    0:17:57

    Like, there have been doubters for a long time for him. Yeah. And most recently, some of this goes back further, which maybe you can speak to, but, you know, there’s the Afghanistan example. During the Obama administration where he is so convinced that he’s right about this, and this, like, leads to one of the long exchanges in the in the her report. There is the twenty twenty primary, where everybody counted them out, the twenty two midterm, where everybody said that they were gonna have a bad midterm, the recession.
  • Speaker 1
    0:18:21

    All the smart people were convinced that there was immediate recession. He said there wasn’t. So again and again, it seems to him that the experts have been wrong that he’s been right And I just wonder if that is leading to a little bit of false confidence. You know, at some point, I was reading an article and I had this image of you know, the guy at the craps table that’s on a hot run and, like, keeps quadrupling their bets. It’s like, are we coming to a crash here?
  • Speaker 1
    0:18:45

    You know, are we about to crap out? Do you think that is right? I mean, is this overconfidence based in surprising the experts of conventional wisdom so much, or is there some nuance to that?
  • Speaker 2
    0:18:56

    The overconfidence has been a fact of his life for a very long time. Like, the things you just named are exactly right. They’re very present in his mind right now. They’re some of the first things that he said to me when I started talking to him about this, you know, in in this interview. Honestly, he was dying to say, as he did, like, they got it wrong in twenty two when they said we were gonna get our ass kicked.
  • Speaker 2
    0:19:17

    They got it wrong in twenty three when they say we’re and they got and they’re gonna get it wrong in twenty and and then he said, of course, as you said, that they told me there was gonna be has he, you know, he’s kind of poking me. He’s like, you and your colleague said there’s gonna be a recession, and there’s not. But it really goes back much earlier than that. And it’s been a and the reason why I mentioned that, I think, Tim, is that it’s a feature of his whole self organizing principle. It goes back to when he was a a kid you know, the old line.
  • Speaker 2
    0:19:40

    Like, show me the boy at seven, and I’ll show you the man. And in some ways, what Joe Biden says of himself as a person is that when he was a kid, he was small. He stuttered. He wasn’t the highest performing kid in a class. And he made up for it, as he said, this is his term.
  • Speaker 2
    0:19:53

    I made up for it by being gut And he did all of these nutty things as a kid. Like, these famous stories where he’d, like, run between the tires of a moving dump truck just to show that he could run from one side to the other. I mentioned these to say that he developed what the great Richard Ben Kramer, you know, in who wrote what it takes, which still to this day is the best account of Joe Biden’s mind written in, you know, in the early nineties, that in there, he captured something that Biden describes of himself. Where he calls it gaming it out, meaning I can game out things that other people think I cannot do, you know, I have the ability to do.
  • Speaker 1
    0:20:28

    Like any Secret Podcast, I said, what it takes sitting up by my desk.
  • Speaker 2
    0:20:31

    Excellent. Good prop right there.
  • Speaker 1
    0:20:33

    We can cruise the Biden chapters together. Thanks. Yeah. So here’s the thing. This is part of what I like about Biden and a lot of people like about Biden.
  • Speaker 1
    0:20:41

    Right? Like this gutsiness, the every man quality, right? He wasn’t the You know? Just leave your Harvard kid like you writing for the net New Yorker. Right?
  • Speaker 1
    0:20:49

    I got there’s something you like about that. You know, you like the fact that he, he’s clear eyed. You know, about what he wants to do. So it’s not as if I’m like, oh, Like, this is a horrible trait to be confidence or overconfident or that he was wrong necessarily about any of these things. But I just sometimes you wonder if it leads.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:08

    You can get into a bubble. Anybody can get into a bubble and boys, the White House of Bubble. And I see things in the article. Like, polling is broken. You can’t get people on the phone.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:18

    And to me, that’s like that’s not confidence. That’s putting your head in the sand. Right? Like, some poles have been wrong, sure. But the polls were basically right in twenty twenty.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:29

    The polls are basically right in twenty twenty two. I keep telling people this, and they’re like, no. No. Everybody said it was a red wave. It’s like, yeah.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:34

    The pundit said it was a red wave based on history.
  • Speaker 2
    0:21:36

    Pundits got it wrong. Got it right.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:38

    The polls were mostly right directionally. I mean, polls are not gonna get right, to a hundred percent. You know, there’s still polls. There’s a margin of error. And, you know, there were some mistakes in twenty sixteen, of course, but that doesn’t you know, match with what has been happening in reality and the polls have been writing these primaries.
  • Speaker 1
    0:21:55

    Like, I they’ve overstated Trump to a certain extent. And some of the on the Republican side, but I think it’s pretty obvious to anybody who’s looking at this. That’s because there’s been this surge of independent and Democrats who hate Trump who are voting in Republican primaries to try to undermine them. So I do wonder how you balance that. Right?
  • Speaker 1
    0:22:11

    Like this confidence, this gutsyness with being willfully naive about Will Saletan, a really important challenge that’s ahead of us over the next few months.
  • Speaker 2
    0:22:20

    I think you identified correctly, a hundred percent, the fulcrum of the piece. Essentially what I was doing over the course of this thing is laying out precisely that question, which is is this level of confidence the sort of thing that sustains you at a moment when there are overwhelming doubts, or is it the kind of thing that history will look back and say he was captive to hubris? I mean, that is the question. I don’t adjudicate. I don’t come to a conclusion because I don’t honestly think that you can in the moment.
  • Speaker 2
    0:22:47

    Right. What you can do is say that a fair reading of his life shows both successes and failures in that similar kind of habit of mind. I mean, look, when he ran for president in eighty seven, as he said later, only many years later, he said I was arrogant. I didn’t deserve to be president. I that was an election as people as readers of what it takes, we’ll remember having it by their bedside.
  • Speaker 2
    0:23:11

    He was, you know, he failed out of that race, having taken lines from other politicians, overstating his resume. There is a degree to which that same impulse, that kind of volcanic ambition to prove people wrong, is also his greatest vulnerability. And we are living right now at a moment when it’s not clear. If this experience is gonna be in the numerator or the denominator of that ratio of his life. And that is an anxious fact, I think.
  • Speaker 1
    0:23:41

    Yeah. I’m anxious. That’s for sure. Okay. So I’m curious on this point, something that was you allude to in the piece.
  • Speaker 1
    0:23:48

    I’d like to to pick out a little bit more is how much he’s letting in new voices, other advice, contrary views in. Obviously, he relies on a very close circle of advisors, Donna, his sister. There was a anecdote that you gave that was for some people worrisome, for others, know, maybe a good sign that he is talking to people. Some of the names that were mentioned, Mitch McConnell, Thomas Friedman, Larry Summers, some merits and demerits to those choices, but, I mean, is he kind of ensconced in a impenetrable bubble of long time advisors or is he, you know, kind of getting enough points of view to challenge maybe some preconceived notions about the state of play?
  • Speaker 2
    0:24:33

    He’s surrounded by a pretty static group of close advisors. And, you know, this goes back to the transcript we talked about earlier today in his interview with Robert Hur. He actually comments on that. He says, look, I’ve had a lot of these people around me for twenty, twenty five years. It’s part of the reason why some of these habits of kind of record keeping were just established years ago and he doesn’t he he doesn’t sort of involve himself in them in his telling.
  • Speaker 2
    0:24:57

    But to your point, I think there is concern that when you don’t have people around you who have a fresh voice who are coming in and saying, hold on. Hold on. Hold on. Why are we being so dubious of polls when we are doing our own polls? Like, is how is it that the science of polling is broken if why are we still conducting our So there is a piece of that.
  • Speaker 2
    0:25:18

    There’s two things going on here that I think are worth mentioning. One is they do their own polls internally. And I was asking around. I said, well, hold on. If you guys are so convinced that science and polling is broken.
  • Speaker 2
    0:25:28

    And why do you bother doing polls internally? They said, well, we’re dubious of our own polls too. Meaning, that they’re getting polls that are showing, okay, this, you know, they don’t it’s not like they’ve got polls that are showing Joe Biden, you know, winning in a landslide right now. They’re also wary of what they see in those things for same reasons. The people he talks to outside, the people you just named, you know, Mitch McConnell, and for reasons, you rightly describe some people tear their hair out at that list.
  • Speaker 2
    0:25:54

    But let’s remember. I mean, Larry Summers has been a thorn in the side of this administration for
  • Speaker 1
    0:25:59

    a lot
  • Speaker 2
    0:25:59

    of reasons.
  • Speaker 1
    0:26:00

    Challenge them like, on the on inflation numbers, big time, though, a contrary view. Yeah.
  • Speaker 2
    0:26:06

    Exactly. And, you know, there are others who I didn’t name in the piece who he has reached, basically, pattern that I have picked up on is if somebody who is a public person who Joe Biden knows their name, if they’re out there trashing him on something and he thinks that they’re doing it in good faith, he’s gonna call them up and say, what’s the deal? What are you doing? Why do you feel this way? And sometimes he then brings that idea into So Larry Summers, prime example, Jason Furman, professor at Harvard, who had been in the Obama administration and economist, you know, one point Furman was one of the leading critics of the administration’s policy saying it was contributing to inflation and so on.
  • Speaker 2
    0:26:42

    Somebody told me that, you know, Biden had said, and and essentially, look, I I know from it. What’s the deal? What’s he saying? Why is he saying it, we should figure this out. But I think the reality is, yes.
  • Speaker 2
    0:26:51

    There are people on the hill, especially who feel that Biden is too insulated by his advisors, and they wanna talk to him more. Now I will also point out this is a completely endless fact. I think since cavemen, you know, members of Congress, the cavemen Congress, we’re like, why doesn’t the president call me more? So
  • Speaker 1
    0:27:08

    Yeah. That’s encouraging that it, you know, the furman anecdote is encouraging that he’s not just calling know, people who are puffing them up. And I’ll say this. The long time advisor thing is a green flag for me. You know, if you look at the candidates that I’ve worked for, And just from this cycle around to Santa’s is a great example of this.
  • Speaker 1
    0:27:24

    If you have a political candidate that doesn’t have anybody who’s been around them for a long time and sheds advisors constantly, that’s a bad sign. Right? Like, that that is a sign that a person, you know, is tough to work with. Doesn’t take feedback. Doesn’t take advice.
  • Speaker 1
    0:27:38

    Right? I I think there are a lot of negative externalities to that.
  • Speaker 2
    0:27:41

    Yeah. I think that’s right.
  • Speaker 1
    0:27:43

    Okay. One more concerning quote is, this year’s campaign will be centered on the Freedom agenda. I like that. That part’s not concerning. The focus will be overwhelmingly on democracy, I I think that I am not one of those.
  • Speaker 1
    0:27:56

    It’s like, you should never talk about democracy. People don’t care about it. I think Axel Rod’s in the story. Talking about how people in Scranton don’t care about democracy. I don’t know.
  • Speaker 1
    0:28:02

    You know, I think in a broad patchwork of arguments, I think that it is an important one. The threat of Donald Trump is important. Well, I was discouraged by the guidelines in your article. I was encouraged by the first add, which doesn’t actually talk about democracy. I mean, does kind of talk about the freedom agenda talks about abortion and and some other issues.
  • Speaker 1
    0:28:19

    So what what is your sense of that of, like, the axle rod view and the Donlin view of, you know, how central democracy is gonna be in this campaign and how they blend that or don’t blend it?
  • Speaker 2
    0:28:32

    It is a a big debate, a sort of really substantive debate that gets at the heart of how they’re going to prosecute campaign. And I know it can seem to, you know, civilians, like, really, why why is this such a big difference? But it is about what’s in the foreground, what’s in the background. I talked to Mike Donald and for this piece at some length because he is the person who is conceiving of and deciding what goes at the top of the list and what goes second. And it’s always going to be some combination of, you know, what we call kitchen table issues.
  • Speaker 2
    0:29:03

    So, you know, how much is your grocery costs, and and then the other question of, is the nation fundamentally at risk? And you’ll notice that in the state of the union, they did both. It was very striking to me. They started with the democracy piece. He starts off talking about Roosevelt.
  • Speaker 2
    0:29:20

    He starts off talking about his predecessor and Putin and the threat to democracy. That’s the freedom agenda. And Reagan and Ukraine. And re exactly. Reagan and Ukraine.
  • Speaker 2
    0:29:29

    So that is the piece of biden and Donn, they believe, like, this is the existential issue of our time. Then they spend probably twice as much of the speech talking about economic issues. Like, you know, how do you make sure that working people have a fair shot? So that talks about going after corporate abuse, price sc gouging, talking about student loans, talking about housing, all of these kinds of things. So in a way, what they’re doing is they’re it’s both there.
  • Speaker 2
    0:29:56

    But I thought that was a noticeable choice. If you’re somebody who’s interested in this debate, they could have started with everyday issues. Like, you know, you know, my fellow Americans, I hear your complaints about struggles that you face every day. He didn’t start with that. He started with we are being called by this bigger thing.
  • Speaker 2
    0:30:11

    So that right there is a sign of how they’re trying to balance these things, put them into some conversation with each other. There’s another thing going on, which is there’s a rhythm to a campaign. And this comes through in what Donald said to me you know, in our interview, we said it clearly. I think I in some ways, if you’re not looking for it in the piece, you don’t see it as clearly as he meant it, which is there’s a different thing that you’re gonna say on, you know, in March than you’re gonna say in November in terms of where the emphasis lies. Like, what is it that is the thing that gets people off their couch to go down and stand in line and vote and Donalden’s view, which is shaped very much by the two thousand four experience.
  • Speaker 2
    0:30:50

    This is something that’s important to mention basically, in two thousand four, in Mike Donnlin’s view, the Democratic Party made a mistake. It didn’t understand that ultimately in his view, that election was still defined by the traumatic overhang of nine eleven, three years earlier, that that was still gonna be the thing that made people decide who to vote for. And he thinks Democrats made a mistake by talking about the economy, by talking about the Iraq war, by talking about hostility to bush. He thinks those were were wrong, and he thinks that in the end, it was always going to be about this kind of primal trauma of nine eleven. And in his view, that equivalent moment was January six, and that that as you get closer to November, particularly as Donald Trump let Trump be trump, and he talks as we know he’s going to about you know, violence and dictatorship and all the things he cares about, that that is going to only crystalize and enhance the clarity of the idea that January sixth remains the thing that this election is about according to Mike Donowitz.
  • Speaker 1
    0:31:51

    Yeah. From head of lips to god’s ears. I noticed they like talking about the January six choir. I had Ben La Bolt on the podcast on Friday, communications director. He likes bringing it up.
  • Speaker 1
    0:31:59

    I’ve noticed that other advisors do Biden will bring it up. And Trump playing in their hands on this posted just last night, you know, that his first three actions are closing the border, drilling, and releasing enough hostages, whatever he calls them January six hostages, On the trump question, so the Biden team keeps signaling that they are itching for a fight on this, and the Biden for a fight. In the article, he made the comment that, down to a party is Herbert Hoover. He doesn’t wanna be Herbert Hoover. He already is Herbert Hoover.
  • Speaker 1
    0:32:29

    Know, there have been reports that he’s talking about how Trump is mentally weak. He thinks he has the better of them that they can get him on tilt. What was your sense of that in that conversation? How much is he champion at the bit for this fight?
  • Speaker 2
    0:32:39

    Hey. I think he does feel as if they’re on very firm ground on the economy. And I I’ve get the sense a little bit that he kinda can’t even really believe his how good it is. I mean, the numbers are simply so much better than you might have imagined a couple of years ago. Set aside whether you think it’s Joe Biden’s doing or not.
  • Speaker 2
    0:32:58

    Just objectively speaking, you know, if you’re a financier in the United States of America on this day, you are a a whole lot better off than you were four years ago. And so there’s a piece of this that Biden believes is both a surface level political fact that he is in better condition for electoral politics because of the health of the economy. And then there’s the underlying which is a little bit more of what you’re getting at, which is sort of where where his heart is, which is that he believes that he has an alternative theory of how to grow the economy than most conventional Democrats have had for a generation, which is in his mind, you have to be willing to tolerate a higher level of inflation in order to prevent a higher level of unemployment And that was how they went through this process. So when he is defending his record on inflation, he’s sort of also defending his belief that people like Bill Clinton got the economy wrong. He doesn’t name Clinton, but that’s what he’s essentially getting sort of arguing against a generation of Democratic party politics.
  • Speaker 1
    0:33:59

    And the personal side that contrasts with Trump, you know, when you’re talking to your mind, how much is he volunteering yet? I, you know, I do think that there’s this you know, there’s kind of like the angel and devil on his shoulder a little bit with Biden where, like, Sundays, he wants to talk about the soul of the nation and be uniting, and sometimes he wants talk about trump being the son of a bitch and failing at everything. Right? And so how did you sense that in your time with him?
  • Speaker 2
    0:34:21

    You know, it’s that’s a great way to put it to him because there is a bit of there’s a bit of the sacred and the profane here. You know, Biden is both a man who wears a rosary on his wrist and is also somebody who you know, is happy to swear like a sailor. So there’s a piece of him that, you know, he can
  • Speaker 1
    0:34:39

    seven. I don’t know if you know about that. That’s pretty standard. That’s a pretty standard combo.
  • Speaker 2
    0:34:44

    Fair enough. It’s I mean, one of his most important stories is about his mother going in as a child when he was a kid and threatening to punch a nun for making fun of his stutters. So, like, these two things are fused in his mind to kind of pugilistic faith. And so in a way, look, I think there’s a piece of Biden that is repulsed by Donald Trump. Tim, he’s repulsed by him, but not only, you know, personally, but also the man attacked the United States capital which is a building where Joe Biden spent thirty six years.
  • Speaker 2
    0:35:15

    He thinks of it as valhalla. And this guy, Trump, sent his people in to break windows and literally defile the building. But I remember one of Biden’s aids had said to me at some point, you know, he misses being a senator. Which is a completely ridiculous thing if you’re the president of the United States. But and, like, have you seen the Senate?
  • Speaker 2
    0:35:35

    Do you really miss being there? But Joe Biden really does feel that way. He thinks it is a truly decent way to spend your days because it is a collegial act of making politics. I know that people are crying out, like, that’s not the Senate today, but that’s the Senate that Joe Biden has in his mind. It’s the Senate of the mind.
  • Speaker 2
    0:35:55

    And in some ways, one of the things that really bothers him about Trump was that Trump doesn’t believe in politics, you know? Like, he just doesn’t. And I think there’s a way in which Biden finds all of that beginning with talking about violence, talking about women the way he does. All of that does just really drive Biden crazy.
  • Speaker 1
    0:36:16

    I wanna get into a couple of other things you’ve done. You wrote a great book a couple of years ago called Wildland, the making of American Fury. It’s sort of related to this topic. It covers the nine eleven to January sixth period. And, you know, you’d been abroad in China.
  • Speaker 1
    0:36:30

    You’ve written a lot about China as well from China and came home. To write this story. I’d like for you to kind of sum up what your main thesis was of it, and, I wanna get into one element.
  • Speaker 2
    0:36:42

    So I I guess my thesis was really me just looking at the country and saying, what happened? How did this happen?
  • Speaker 1
    0:36:49

    Because you really felt it was it was changed. When you how long were you gone? How long were you in China?
  • Speaker 2
    0:36:54

    I was gone for eleven years. I was in the Middle East for a couple of years and then went to China and and was there for eight years and then came back. And so it was, I guess, eleven years, yeah, total. And the, you know, I don’t have any illusions that we were the promised land beforehand. But there were things that happened that did feel like a fundamental change.
  • Speaker 2
    0:37:14

    I’ll just give you one example from the book. You know, I had been in this little town in West Virginia called Clarksburg, where I my first job out of college, was at a little newspaper there. And Clarksburg was in the late nineties when I was there, it was all Democrats, you know. And then it switched and it switched so profoundly as we all know, West Virginia is now some of the most reliable Republican territory in America. And it’s happened so rapidly and so thoroughly.
  • Speaker 2
    0:37:41

    I think a lot of people don’t really know the story of it happened and why it happened. And it’s a story that is as much about how Republicans figured out an opportunity there as it is also about Democrats losing sight of a piece of the country where they used to have really deep roots. I mean, in West Virginia today, there are still people this is a fake example of somebody, but it’s not impossible. But there are a lot of people who have, like, a FDR portrait on their wall. This is a true thing.
  • Speaker 2
    0:38:10

    That’s a very
  • Speaker 1
    0:38:10

    common fact. For Kennedy, for sure. Yeah.
  • Speaker 2
    0:38:13

    Yeah. The Kennedy. I mean, Kennedy, and we can talk about that. The, you know, the Kennedy story in West Virginia is so important And then they also now vote for Donald Trump. And so I wanted to understand how did that kind of thing happen because you can’t understand how our politics so furious, you know, sort of divided without understanding the dynamics in play there.
  • Speaker 1
    0:38:32

    And so that gets to the fundamental question that we hash out a lot on the Bulwark, which is about this Pure. Right? And I think that there’s some elements of it in the US, Virginia is a unique example because in some ways it’s legit in certain West Virginia, there’s certain parts of the state that have really been hollowed out and hurt by globalization, etcetera. And yet, then you look at other parts of your book, you know, there’s the granite part, you know, the folks that have super yachts, my colleague JV last likes to look at the boat index and talk about how many boats are being purchased on up has boat parades. Generally, if you have enough money for a boat, you’re not exactly struggling.
  • Speaker 1
    0:39:08

    You haven’t exactly been, you know, hollowed out by globalization. And so how much of this fury is righteous fury about ways in which elites really did let them down? How much of the fury is decadence, right, is jealousy, pettiness. Right? What was your kind of assessment as you?
  • Speaker 1
    0:39:26

    Explored, traversed the country trying to get to the bottom of this.
  • Speaker 2
    0:39:29

    That’s a great question, Tim. I mean, I chose the word in the subtitle very, very deliberately. It’s the making of America’s fury is how I decided to describe this book because some of it was made, meaning it is a product of us, in some cases, a set of industries that are designed to generate fury. It is also a product of a set of ideas that became normalized give you an example. So you mentioned Granwich, which is the Grange Connecticut where I grew up and is in its own way a kind of fascinating place to look at the evolution of the Republican Party.
  • Speaker 2
    0:40:03

    It is quite literally where George H. W. Bush grew up. So it is the That was my people.
  • Speaker 1
    0:40:09

    Right. You know, northeastern Rockefeller Republicans. Those were my peeps.
  • Speaker 2
    0:40:12

    You know? That’s exactly it. You know, Press got Bush, as you know, with the father of George H. W. Bush, he was like the man of the town.
  • Speaker 2
    0:40:19

    He was like, he ran the local Town meeting. He then eventually became the United States Senator. He was Eisenhower Howard’s golf partner. And you went from that to the fact that the head of the Republican town committee in twenty sixteen endorsed Donald Trump for president, and I was just kind of fascinated by how you went from that to that.
  • Speaker 1
    0:40:41

    To genteel to the furious. Right? Yeah. To the rage filled. Yeah.
  • Speaker 2
    0:40:45

    Yeah. And truth is, you know, there’s always been an element of both. And even today, as you know, you know, you’ll sometimes you can find yourself talking to somebody who owns a big boat and is also then talking about politics in the most kind of furious way and you find it kind of bad. So I think to your question, part of what changed is about how people feel connected or disconnected to their fellow American, which is a fancy term but it’s a big idea. Meaning, one of the the metaphors in the book that I really found powerful was the building of these these stone walls in greenwich.
  • Speaker 2
    0:41:22

    And, you know, in greenwich, they’re, you know, you go back to the days of, you know, the settlers back in the eighteenth century, and they would build these little farmer stonewall. And over the course of the nineties, when you had money being generated on an extraordinary scale in places like Granwich and elsewhere, the walls started to grow quite literally the walls, meaning that they went from being these little tiny Robert frost metaphors of, you know, good neighbors to being actually barriers of fortress making. They were about being inside and who is outside. They were a reflection of a perception of threat. The idea that, you know, I have stuff that other people are gonna try to take from me and I must defend my stuff.
  • Speaker 2
    0:42:02

    And there was a period in which that metaphor it was really a reflection of a kind of vision of the country that became much more to use your good word. There was a sort of jealousness about it of saying I must protect myself against those who will seek to take things from me.
  • Speaker 1
    0:42:19

    To me, there’s like a high school cafeteria element of all of it. Always kind of wanna just move to the side. I think that there is, you know, particularly in Appalachian. Because your book covers all these, you know, areas, right, a good, you’re in Chicago, you’re in Granite, you’re in Appalachian, and I do think I’m much more sympathetic to the Appalachian and element of this, like, just this overhaul of the industry and over you know, overhaul of the economy in those places. But there’s a lot of parts of the country where there is this.
  • Speaker 1
    0:42:44

    Elite jealous of other elites. Right? It’s like, I’m doing well financially, or we’re doing well politically, but they’re getting more attention. Right? Like, they’re more popular than I am.
  • Speaker 1
    0:42:54

    You know? And and I do think that That is the the the shallow fury drives a huge percentage of of what we’re seeing right now.
  • Speaker 2
    0:43:04

    Somebody once told me over the last few years, and I I wish I remember who it was, but it’s a really vivid way of describing it that the typical, ultimately, the ideal trump voter is not the out of work coal miner. He’s the assistant manager at the car dealership in town. And what that means and the assistant is the key word there. He wants to be the manager of the car dealership. And he’s on some level, he’s pissed Right?
  • Speaker 2
    0:43:30

    You’ve met that guy. I’ve met that guy.
  • Speaker 1
    0:43:33

    That guy is even a little bit more sympathetic to me than the car manager who’s also for Trump, who’s pissed because, you know, he’s not getting the key to the city anymore because the key to the city went to the teacher who was spanish, and they want and they he felt like he didn’t get it because he’s a white guy. Right? And it was, like, deI or wokeness or something. Was and, like, back in the sixties, he would have been, big man in town. And now, you know, like, that is the person that bugs me more.
  • Speaker 1
    0:43:58

    I I agree both of those archetypes are in the trump booth, but the the latter one is one that bugs me more. I wanna ask you about your last article before I let you go. And I was a little surprised for you. A little dessert. Rules for the ruling class, how to survive among the elites, while pretending they’re your enemy, you start that article telling the tale of Tucker McNir swanson Carlson, foot frozen food air, I found, I didn’t find this, actually.
  • Speaker 1
    0:44:23

    I don’t wanna overstate it. I I bumped into on the internet as one does. An old video of Tucker much younger Tucker, bow tie tucker, you know, frat swoop, talking about Bill O’Reilly. And I’d like for you to listen to this.
  • Speaker 5
    0:44:36

    I say before that that, you know, Bill Riley is really talented. He’s more talented than I am. You know,
  • Speaker 6
    0:44:39

    he’s got a lot more viewers than I do.
  • Speaker 5
    0:44:40

    He’s a better communicator than I am. But I think there’s kind of a deep phoniness at the center of his shtick. And again, as I say, the shtick is sort of built on this perception that he is the character he plays. He is every man. This kind of he’s not right, Wayne.
  • Speaker 5
    0:44:54

    He’s a populist. This kind of Irish Catholic populist fighting for you against the powers that be. And that’s great as a schtick, but I’m just saying the moment that it’s revealed not to be true It’s over. The moment he gets caught, you know, slapping a flight attendant on the Concorde for not bringing his champagne fast enough or barking at you know, one of his subordinates to take the, you know, Brown M and M’s out of my bowling, get me a bottle of Evion or something like that. The second that makes page six It’s over, right?
  • Speaker 5
    0:45:20

    Because the whole thing is predicated on the fact that he is who he says he is. And just Nobody is that person, especially not someone who makes a million dollars, you know, or many millions.
  • Speaker 1
    0:45:31

    Well, Evan, that kinda sounds familiar.
  • Speaker 2
    0:45:34

    It was prophecy. I mean, it was he was describing the world that he came to be. I mean, in you know, it’s a reminder of, too, is in some ways, one of the tragedies of Tucker Carlson was that he was a capable writer in an earlier phase of his life. Like, he
  • Speaker 1
    0:45:50

    I reread his George Bush profile recently for some I forget what the contact was. It’s really great. Totally. It’s really great. Yeah.
  • Speaker 2
    0:45:58

    And then he he abandoned all of it Really? I mean, he just I the reason I wanted to write about him was because his life of extraordinary advantages one after another beginning at birth continuing through the, as he acknowledges in sort of the outer reaches of the internet that his girlfriend’s father got him into college when he couldn’t get into the to colleges. Things like that, that in a way, the idea that he then became the warrior against the elites is a chef’s kiss moment of such extraordinary I don’t even know what to call it, Tim. My words have I’m out of the words. It was kind of amazing to me how many people are running against elites now who are card carrying charter members of the elite.
  • Speaker 1
    0:46:51

    What do you think’s underneath it? You know, because is it I because it’s like you could think about it and it’s like, is it income inequality? Because income inequality is a lot worse, or is it decadence, right, or is it the fact that, like, We need drama in our lives. Humans need drama, and we don’t have real hardship right now. And this is the meanest way to look at it.
  • Speaker 1
    0:47:10

    Right? Are the how do their hardships look compared to hardships of generations, how do their lives look, you know, and may so maybe it’s just this need for drama, or maybe it’s not, or maybe it is more legit. I don’t know. Where do you where do you land on all that?
  • Speaker 2
    0:47:22

    I mean, the thing you’re describing, which I completely agree with, is there is an element of I’m gonna mangle it slightly, but Fukuyama describes it as a kind of strategic boredom. A kind of profound spiritual level boredom. And I think that certainly applies to people like Tucker Carlson. I think there is another element So he is he’s utterly unchallenged in any deep real way, and therefore directs his energies in in all of these other ways of trying to kind of remind himself that he’s alive. I think there is this other element, which is simpler and to your earlier point is at the heart of the matter, which is he tried and he lost out.
  • Speaker 2
    0:48:05

    He tried to be George stephanopoulos. He tried to be the guy at the center ring of American political commentary, and his television show was canceled on CNN, then his television show was canceled on MSNBC. He tried to make a website that would be the conservative version of the New York Times that did not come to pass. And so finally, he goes to Fox News, and there he finds himself. And so on on some level, in the end, it’s like the frustration with the reality and the recognition on some level deep within himself that he’s never going to be the person that everybody respects for their knowledge and wet.
  • Speaker 2
    0:48:49

    And so he’ll be something else. He’ll be somebody standing outside and shouting at the people within.
  • Speaker 1
    0:48:56

    I’ve been awesome. I really appreciate your time. Staff writer at the New Yorker recent profile Joe Biden’s last campaign. He got to see where Trump watched the revolution. While he sat and drank some diet cokes.
  • Speaker 1
    0:49:08

    Thank you so much, Heaven. Let’s do this again sometime.
  • Speaker 2
    0:49:10

    My pleasure, Tim. Thanks for having me. We’ll see you brother.
  • Speaker 6
    0:49:14

    Ladies and gentlemen, this time around, the revolution will not be televised.
  • Speaker 3
    0:49:22

    As we proceed to give you what she did. And then here in the guest, they hit my first mail. I present exhibit c.
  • Speaker 7
    0:49:44

    When I was sleeping on the train, sleeping on, that’s a roll laugh out in the rain without even a single slice of pizza to my too proud to beg for change master in the pain when New York was calling Southern rapper’s Lane, but then Jack and I swing. I used to get dizzy spells. Hero ring the voice of an angel, telling me my name, telling me that one day I’m a be a great man transforming with the megatron Doster. Explained. I ain’t believe it, then I was homeless fighting to shoot die smoking on the corners, trying to find the meaning of life in the corona till the five percenters rolled up on them.
  • Speaker 7
    0:50:26

    You eat the build or destroy where you come from. The magnolia projects in the third wall, slum. This point amazing that you rhyme. How you doing that you shine like you grew up in the shrine and blue.
  • Speaker 3
    0:50:39

    Arrest my case. Oh, love.
  • Speaker 1
    0:50:48

    The Secret Podcast is produced by Katie Cooper with audio engineering and editing by Jason Brown.
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